Our Sustainable Site

For several years, we have been working to enhance and improve the sustainability of the Addison Road Community Centre in many different ways.

Total electricity consumption dropped significantly from late 2013, when tenants became responsible for their own power bills, and became more efficient again with the introduction of new electricity infrastructure for the whole Centre in 2018, with total distribution allowed to the site capped by Ausgrid. An impressive reduction in carbon has been achieved with the installation of solar panels across the north-facing roof of Hut One just before Christmas 2017. This conversion was funded by a fantastic community solar partnership with Get Up! And Powershop that has seen savings of 16.25 tonnes of CO2, in just over a year.

Our ongoing care and maintenance of the 165 trees at Addi Road contributes to providing habitat, shade and water retention in the neighbourhood, while we continue to contract a full waste-recovery service to sort and recycle the mixed waste that goes into the bins at the Centre every day. The Return and Earn ‘reverse-vending machine’ on site is one of the most popular container recycling stations in Sydney, and is making a major contribution not only to reducing litter but also to personal and community fundraising, thanks to the 10c refund paid for each container.

Addi Road sits on a kind of natural gathering point near the top of the north Marrickville catchment for the former Gumbramorra swamp and before it flows into the Cooks River basin. Whilst this is what kept the land open and undeveloped while all around was subdivided more than a century ago, it also means that the site still faces flooding following heavy rain and this challenges this brings are only increasing as the weather becomes more extreme due to climate change. Stormwater management is a big issue for us, and was improved in early 2018 thanks to a NSW Community Builders grant awarded through the office of Jo Haylen.

Other projects that increase the sustainability of the site include attractive wooden decking platforms along the avenue of Queensland box trees on Vivi Koutsounadis Drive. These protect the roots of the heritage trees from soil compaction and erosion whilst also providing space for recreation, social interaction and community events, and were funded by a Stronger Communities grant from Inner West Council in 2018.

Our Sustainable Site

For several years, we have been working to enhance and improve the sustainability of the Addison Road Community Centre in many different ways.

Total electricity consumption dropped significantly from late 2013, when tenants became responsible for their own power bills, and became more efficient again with the introduction of new electricity infrastructure for the whole Centre in 2018, with total distribution allowed to the site capped by Ausgrid. An impressive reduction in carbon has been achieved with the installation of solar panels across the north-facing roof of Hut One just before Christmas 2017. This conversion was funded by a fantastic community solar partnership with Get Up! And Powershop that has seen savings of 16.25 tonnes of CO2, in just over a year.

Our ongoing care and maintenance of the 165 trees at Addi Road contributes to providing habitat, shade and water retention in the neighbourhood, while we continue to contract a full waste-recovery service to sort and recycle the mixed waste that goes into the bins at the Centre every day. The Return and Earn ‘reverse-vending machine’ on site is one of the most popular container recycling stations in Sydney, and is making a major contribution not only to reducing litter but also to personal and community fundraising, thanks to the 10c refund paid for each container.

Addi Road sits on a kind of natural gathering point near the top of the north Marrickville catchment for the former Gumbramorra swamp and before it flows into the Cooks River basin. Whilst this is what kept the land open and undeveloped while all around was subdivided more than a century ago, it also means that the site still faces flooding following heavy rain and this challenges this brings are only increasing as the weather becomes more extreme due to climate change. Stormwater management is a big issue for us, and was improved in early 2018 thanks to a NSW Community Builders grant awarded through the office of Jo Haylen.

Other projects that increase the sustainability of the site include attractive wooden decking platforms along the avenue of Queensland box trees on Vivi Koutsounadis Drive. These protect the roots of the heritage trees from soil compaction and erosion whilst also providing space for recreation, social interaction and community events, and were funded by a Stronger Communities grant from Inner West Council in 2018.

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